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We Remember the Fallen

The poppy is a symbol of identification for Veterans Day or Remembrance Day in England. They are worn for several weeks before Nov 11th. You will see almost the entire community wearing them from politicians to schoolchildren. If you have watched TV in the recent weeks, you may have seen British people wearing them in the lapel. I believe Canada does the same. .Scarlet poppies (popaver rhoeas) grow naturally in conditions of disturbed earth throughout Western Europe countries. The Canadian surgeon John McCrae in his poem In Flanders Field realized the significance of the poppy as a lasting memorial symbol to the fallen: . In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields By Capt. John McCrae 1915 .The poppy came to represent the immeasurable sacrifice made by his comrades and quickly became a lasting memorial to those who died in the First World War and later conflicts. We shall not forget youwe shall remember&&.. always

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Angie Waszkiewicz 09 Apr 2006

Thank you for the history of that tradition! It is good to learn new things.

stephanie atlee 14 Nov 2005

wow...wonderful and moving image

Thomas Broadfoot 14 Nov 2005

Good work on this

Rebecca Mullan 13 Nov 2005

(I love that poem too Richard) Yup we do wear the red poppies here in Canada. I love your tribute - the crosses of poppies are wonderfully configured...reminds me of a weaving...as in a tapestry. A very fitting tribute to the freedoms and privleges we enjoy today thanks to those who served with such courage. Well done!!

Emily Reed 13 Nov 2005

Very nice commemoration.